Fattoria Selvapiana

Chianti Rufina Wines and Olive Oils, Tuscany, Italy, Vigneto Bucerchiale, Selvapiana Chianti Rufina, Selvapiana Pomino Rosso Doc, Villa Di Petrognano Vendemmia, Pomino doc, Fornace, Syrah, Vin Santo del Chianti Rufina

chianti rufina

Courtney Scheissl recommended the 2015 Selvapiana Chianti Rufina

Courtney Scheissl, editor for VinePair recommended the 2015 Selvapiana Chianti Rufina in today’s post. Please see below for a link and the full article. SELVAPIANA CHIANTI RÙFINA 2015 My first and only trip to Chianti was a disaster. Mechanical issues, delayed flights, and endless rebooking lines delayed the arrival of an already short trip by almost a full day, landing me in a gray, rainy Florence shortly before sunset. I lamented the sights (and glasses of wine) that I was missing through the foggy, winding car trip into the heart of Chianti, which culminated in a stomach-upending climb into a hilltop village. Of course, the streets were too narrow to fit my taxi, leaving me to roll my mercifully small suitcase on uneven cobblestones solo. Clad in a day-old airplane outfit, I was exasperated and ready to turn around and head back to my cramped New York apartment. But as I reached the crest of the hill, the clouds parted to reveal a postcard-perfect sunset over the lush landscape, rainfall still clinging to the sprawling cypress trees. I took a deep breath of cool, damp evening air, and all my frustrations faded. That quiet, peaceful moment is exactly what the Selvapiana Chianti Rùfina 2015 evokes. With the exception of the traditional Chianti Classico zone, Chianti Rùfina is considered the most consistent and quality-driven subregion of Chianti. Cool breezes tend to create a style of wine with elegance and freshness, which the Selvapiana Chianti Rùfina certainly showcases. The aromas of this Sangiovese-based wine are fresh and cool, with notes of cranberries, cherry blossoms, basil, and turned earth, like a spring garden accented by morning dew. The palate leans toward the prettier side of Chianti, but it isn’t overly floral in any way. It’s clean and medium-bodied, just the kind of easy-drinking red that could easily find its way onto the Tuesday dinner table. But while it isn’t fussy, it isn’t a simple, throwaway wine either. And next to making the long and possibly exhausting trip to Tuscany, it’s the next best thing to being there. https://vinepair.com/good-wine-reviews/selvapiana-chianti-rufina-2015/


Tuscany by Vinum

The Tuscany dossier of Vinum magazine, with reviews of Chianti wines d.o.c.g. Chianti DOCG - Lagenweine mit Pepp


Liberty wines – Selvapiana 20 Years

Jancis Robinson Rewiew: A toast to Liberty Wines' David Gleave Selvapiana Vigneto Bucerchiale Chianti Rufina Riserva 2013, Chianti Rufina, Tuscany, Italy 17.5 points Pale fox red. Very sweet palate entry; you are really aware of the sunshine here! Transparency and considerable terroir effect. A real wine of place. Wonderfully long and tender. Vibrates. Selvapiana 2013 Pomino 17 points Dark and well-aged look. Rather Pomerol-like on the nose. Sweet and beautifully made with refined tannins but a little bite at the end – really lively! Like the perkiest claret imaginable. Good length.


Selvapiana Chianti Rufina 2015 Bruce Sanderson review

90 Points - 2015 Selvapiana Chianti Rufina DOCG Pure cherry aromas and flavors are enhanced by a smoky element in this juicy, round red. Hints of earth and mineral add interest on the finish. Drink now through 2023. 7,000 cases made. — Bruce Sanderson Selvapiana Chianti Rufina 2015 review from Wine Spectator


Latest Selvapiana July 2017 press clips

Attached please find all press from this past month: Wine Spectator - Selvapiana Fornace Wine Spectator - Selvapiana Chianti Rufina Vigneto Bucerchiale Riserva Wine Spectator -Selvapiana Tuscany


Latest Selvapiana March and April 2017 press clips

Attached please find all press from this past month: Wine Enthusiast - Selvapiana 2012 Telegram & Gazette - Selvapiana Chianti Rufina 2014 Forbes.com - Fattoria Selvapiana Pomino “Villa Petrognano” DOC, 2011


Bryce Wiatrak featured Selvapiana in his Vin Santo article for Vinous Media

Bryce Wiatrak featured Selvapiana in his Vin Santo article for Vinous Media.  Selvapiana The furthest north I traveled in my exploration of Vin Santo was to Chianti Rùfina to visit Federico Giuntini at Selvapiana. I can hardly characterize an entire sub-region based solely on one producer, nonetheless for a wine as unpredictable as Vin Santo. But, Selvapiana’s Vin Santos show more finesse and less body than their more southerly relatives (including those of Giuntini’s cousin Roberto Stucchi Prinetti at Badia a Coltibuono), similar to how one might generally compare Chianti Rùfina with Chianti Classico. After harvest around the end of September, Giuntini hangs the grapes from bamboo rods to dry for five months. The wine spends six years in caratelli, made mostly from either French or Slavonian oak, but a few chestnut barrels remain. Giuntini misses the cherry caratelli, and would love to bring some back into the program. I had the distinct pleasure of tasting through ten vintages of Selvapiana’s Vin Santodel Chianti Rùfina. Giuntini tracked down bottles dating back to 1958 for this tasting. One quality that binds Selvapiana’s Vin Santos is a crystalline purity of flavor, unmatched by any of the other producers I visited. One hundred-percent Trebbiano, these are wines driven by acidity, untethered from their viscosity. In many respects, this is a more subdued variant of Vin Santo, more slender than many of its relatives. Beginning with the 2007, you immediately enjoy an orange juiciness that runs through the wine. It flashes all the other more savory notes associated with Vin Santo– garden herbs, buttered popcorn – but it’s never bogged down by them. It shows a rewarding viscidity without carrying a heaviness of flavor. The 2006 and 2003 are where Selvapiana’s Vin Santos really hit their stride. This extra time in bottle composes the wine into a Mozartian precision. Every note in these Vin Santos finds its way into a perfect contrapuntal balance. The 2006 demonstrates an iridescent, cold minerality that grows broad through a medley of fresh white peaches, nectarine and apricot. The 2003, too low in alcohol to achieve DOC recognition, boasts an even more expressive nose and unfolds slowly on palate. The acidity is so laser-like and long, it seems to finish far after the rest of the wine. Moving to the 2001, the Vin Santo at this age starts to imbue a more medicinal character – rosemary, quinine, sage. The fruit takes a backseat to these more earthly flavors. Federico explains that 2001 was a hotter vintage and he replaced many caratelli that year, which combined could account for the dramatic difference between this and the 2003. The 1999 treads a similar path as the 2001, the herbaceousness contributing a slight astringency. By 1998 we find a much darker Vin Santo, both in its hue and flavor profile. Notes of beeswax and bittersweet chocolate collide with the taste of wild mushrooms and ash. The 1997 seems to be aging at a tad slower pace. It’s a few shades brighter – caffè latte, rather than straight-up espresso. The 1993 shows darker still. Oxidation takes its toll on the Vin Santo, condensing the wine into a mass of burnt cashew, coffee grounds and cocoa beans. The astringency is undeniable, but it’s not an altogether unpleasant one. If anything, it’s an intellectually engaging experience tasting these lighter-bodied Vin Santos at this stage in their development, as was also the case with San Giusto a Rentenanno. While more unctuous renditions may never achieve the clarity of expression that defines these two producers’ Vin Santos, they nevertheless seem to outlive them, protected by that extra layer of insulation. Clusters hanging in the appassitoio at Selvapiana The last two Vin Santos in the flight, 1985 and 1958, are both in the winter of their lives, but reveal a fascinating window into the narrative of this product. Both vintages long before the creation of Vin Santo del Chianti DOC, these wines are labeled vino da tavola. The 1985 really embodies an amontillado character – saline and rich, like a perfect beef consommé. While the wine ends with a bitterness instead of that thrilling acidity, the butter flavors start to dance with more vitality than any of its younger brethren. The 1958 has lost much of its body by this age, whittled down to a salty skeleton. Much like its bottle, the wine shows a certain patina and tastes sprinkled with sawdust, the imbibable equivalent of walking into a cluttered antique shop, the dusty air illuminated by scattered rays of golden light. Federico defines these two wines as the old-style of Vin Santo, meant for the immediate consumption of friends rather than extended time in a collector’s cellar. So, they may not prove fully indicative of what will come of the more recent releases. What a treat it is, though, to taste history like this. Read the full article here: http://www.antoniogalloni.com/articles/tuscany-s-mysterious-self-making-vin-santo-mar-2016


Certificate of L’Impronta in the new edition of the Guide “WINE OF ITALY 2017

With pleasure we publish the certificate of L'Impronta that Go Wine has acknowledged to Selvapiana on the new edition of the Guide "WINE OF ITALY 2017 - Guide to the Wine Tourist."


An old Rufina in perfect shape. By Luciano Pignataro Blogs

By Luciano Pignataro Blogs (http://www.lucianopignataro.it/a/toscana-1990-tre-chianti-casanova-neri/118941/). Toscana 1990: tre Chianti e il Casanova di Neri Ci si ritrova alla Galleria di Poggibonsi tra Giovani Igp. Qui Carlo Macchi ci trascina per farci mangiare mare in mezzo al Chianti prima di una epocale riunione di Garantito Igp con Stefano Tesi, Angelo Peretti, Andrea Petrini, Lorenzo Colombo e Roberto Giuliani. Da anni uno dei pochi segnali di aggregazione in web. Sarà per non siamo figli della rete ma delle reti. Fatto sta che non c’è niente di più bello che degustare vini in questo modo: Antichi Toscani dala cantina di Macchi raffreddato. Un atto di generosità enologica senza precedenti:-) Ci troviamo così questi quattro vini e ce li godimo tutti. Incredibile ma vero, a distanza di tanti anni quello che ci è piaciuto più di tutti è il Chianti Classico Riserva Selvapiana, un antico Rufina in perfetta forma, fresco, tonico, meraviglioso sul cino con ancora in serbo tante cose da regalare. Nonostante appartenga ad un’altra era geologica rispetto alla sua attuale evoluzione, paradossalmente il Casanova di Neri è invece quello che, pur affascinante e buono, è quello che ci ha rilassato di meno il palato. Troppo esuberante e materico per i Giovani Igp. A metà strada gli altri due, verso il Rufina il Ser Lapo di Castello di Fonterutoli. In direzione del Casanova di Neri il Monsanto del Poggio. Conclusioni Non siamo nei mitici anni ’80, ma sicuramente impressione bere questi rossi a distanza di tanti anni e vedere come hanno tenuto bene nel tempo. Note di frutta, freschezza, legno ben digerito come si diceva qualche anno fa, nessuna esasperazione per stupire inutilmente il palato. Spesso per godere il vino bisogna aspettarlo nel tempo. Ma la domanda finale è stata un po’ inquietante: quanti rossi del decennio successivo avranno questa capacità di affascinare chi li stappa? Ne parliamo tra 20 anni:-)


Selvapiana Chianti Rufina 2014: good to the last drop (3 days later)

Just a quickie this very busy Thursday morning as the food and wine world seems to be finally getting back online. I opened the above bottle of Selvapiana Chianti Rufina 2014 four nights ago and drank two glasses with dinner over the last three evenings. And man, the very last glass, which I paired with rotisserie chicken and a baked potato (dressed simply with extra-virgin olive oil, Kosher salt, and freshly cracked pepper), was the best of all. I was just blown away by how vibrant and how varietally expressive this wine was. It wasn’t just hanging in there on the third night. It was actually even better than the previous evening. What a great wine and what a great value… All things considered, for the price (around $17 in my market) and quality and availability throughout the U.S., this is one of my all-time top wines. Definitely in my top 5 for greater Chianti. It also paired gorgeously with Tracie P’s Neapolitan-style ragù on nights one and two. That’s all I have time for today… more tomorrow… Thanks for being here. Posted on January 12, 2017 by Do Bianchi - https://dobianchi.com/2017/01/12/best-chianti-classico-rufina/


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